CEF Soldier Detail

Lieutenant Francis Clarence McGee
Died: September 16, 1916

Regimental Number:
NA
Survived War:
No
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Infantry
Battalion:
21st Battalion
Company:
Place of Birth:
Ottawa, Ontario
Country:
Canada
Next of Kin:
John McGee, Father, Ottawa, Ontario
Address at Enlistment:
Date of Birth:
November 4, 1878
Trade or Calling:
Civil Servant
Marital Status:
Single
Prior Military Experience:
Yes
Place of Enlistment:
Kingston, Ontario
Date of Enlistment:
November 9, 1914
Age at enlistment:
36
Height:
5 Feet 6 Inches
Chest:
35 Inches
Expansion:
5 Inches
Religion:
Roman Catholic
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Killed in Action
Battle Died/Wounded:
Courcelette, France
Date of Death:
September 16, 1916
Age at Death:
37
Buried at:
Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France
Plot:
N/A
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
No
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Caucasian
LAC Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 6829-29
Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Lieutenant Canadian Infantry 21st Battalion

Son of John Joseph and Elizabeth McGee, of 183, Wilbrod St., Ottawa, Ontario, nephew of the assassinated Canadian politician, Thomas D'Arcy McGee. Won the Stanley Cup 3 times (1903, 1904, 1905) with Ottawa. Frank Patrick described him as a player: "He was even better than they say he was. He had everything - speed, stickhandling, scoring ability and was a punishing checker. He was strongly built but beautifully proportioned and he had an almost animal rhythm." In his 4 years with Ottawa, he played 23 regular season games scoring 71 goals, and 22 playoff games where he scored 63 times. McGee died serving his country at Courcelette, France, during World War I. One of hockey's greatest scorers, he was among the first group of players elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1945.

In 1900, McGee had lost an eye playing hockey, a disability that should have prohibited him from enlisting. In 1915, with the 21st Battalion he was wounded in the knee, which should have ended his military career. He continued as a Motorcycle dispatch rider until he was killed at Courcelette.