CEF Soldier Detail

Lieutenant Lester Bowles 'Mike' Pearson
Died: December 27, 1972

Regimental Number:
1059
Survived War:
Yes
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Infantry
Battalion:
1st Depot Battalion, Western Ontario Regiment
Company:
Place of Birth:
Newtonbrook, Ontario
Country:
Canada
Next of Kin:
Reverend Edwin Arthur Pearson, father. Chatham, Ontario
Address at Enlistment:
Date of Birth:
April 23, 1897
Trade or Calling:
Student
Marital Status:
Single
Prior Military Experience:
Yes
Place of Enlistment:
Toronto, Ontario
Date of Enlistment:
April 27, 1915
Age at enlistment:
18
Height:
5 Feet 9 Inches
Chest:
34 1/2 Inches
Expansion:
3 1/2 Inches
Religion:
Wesleyan
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Survived
Battle Died/Wounded:
Date of Death:
December 27, 1972
Age at Death:
75
Buried at:
Maclaren Cemetery, Wakefield, Quebec
Plot:
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
No
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Caucasian
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Lieutenant Canadian Infantry 1st Depot Battalion, Western Ontario Regiment
Lieutenant Royal Flying Corps Royal Flying Corps
Private Canadian Army Medical Corps No. 4 Canadian General Hospital Quartermaster Stores
Lieutenant Canadian Infantry 4th Reserve Battalion
Corporal Canadian Army Medical Corps No. 4 Canadian General Hospital
Corporal Canadian Army Medical Corps Canadian Army Medical Corps Depot

Son of Reverend Edwin Arthur Pearson and Anne Sarah Pearson (nee Bowles); husband of Maryon Elspeth Pearson (nee Moody) married August 22, 1925

14th Canadian Prime Minister of Canada from 22 April 1963 to 20 April 1968. Student at University of Toronto, Ontario. Hospital unit he served with was sponsored by the University. Served two years in England, Greece, and Egypt after which he was commissioned an officer then transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. He suffered two flying accidents, the second of which incurred injuries which lead to him being invalided out of the services. It was during his time in flying school that he earned the nickname, 'Mike', since his instructor felt the name Lester was insufficiently "warlike". He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1957 for the part he played in helping to defuse the Suez Crisis of 1956. Member of Canadian Officer Training Corps.