CEF Soldier Detail

Captain Frederick Grant Banting
Died: February 21, 1941

Regimental Number:
NA
Survived War:
Yes
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Army Medical Corps
Battalion:
M.D. No. 2
Company:
Place of Birth:
Alliston, Ontario
Country:
Canada
Next of Kin:
Mrs. W.J. Banting, Allister, Ontario
Address at Enlistment:
University of Toronto
Date of Birth:
November 14, 1892
Trade or Calling:
Medical Student
Marital Status:
Single
Prior Military Experience:
Yes
Place of Enlistment:
Toronto, Ontario
Date of Enlistment:
September 8, 1915
Age at enlistment:
22
Height:
5 Feet 10 Inches
Chest:
39 Inches
Expansion:
3 Inches
Religion:
Presbyterian
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Survived
Battle Died/Wounded:
1918 wounded during Battle of Cambrai
Date of Death:
February 21, 1941
Age at Death:
48
Buried at:
Plot:
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
No
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Caucasian
LAC Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 1Box 414-41
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Captain Canadian Army Medical Corps M.D. No. 2
Captain Canadian Army Medical Corps No. 13 Field Ambulance
Captain Canadian Army Medical Corps 2nd Field Hospital
Lieutenant Canadian Army Medical Corps No. 2 Field Ambulance B Sec

Frederick Grant Banting is best known for discovering Insulin to treat diabetes. Together with Charles Best, a student at the University of Toronto, they made the first successful treatment on January 23, 1922. He was awarded the 1923 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. His co-discoverers and he refused to seek a patent for it and sold the rights for the formuation for $1 to the University of Toronto. This ensured that insulin would be affordable to all (and likely cost them a potential fortune). He helped to develop the first G-suit to help pilots endure high speed flight. On February 21st,1941,  bound for England as part of his WW2 duties, his plane crashed at Musgrave Harbour, Newfoundland killing all except the pilot. Frederick G Banting served 2 years with 36th Peel Battalion of Infantry of the  Canadian Militia prior to September 1915. Fred Banting was born 14 November 1891 not in 1892 as was stated on this Attestation form plus he had poor eyesight which prevented his Military acceptance in 1914.

Sir Frederick Grant Banting KBE MC FRS FRSC( 14 Nov 1891-21 Feb 1941) was a Canadian Medical Doctor Scientist Physician painter and Nobel Laureate noted as the Co discoverer of Insulin and its Therapeutic potential is buried in Toronto Mount Pleasant Cemetery  in Section 29 Lot 29 not far from Dr Charles Best who is also buried in Section 29.

Awards and Decorations
Military Cross