CEF Soldier Detail

Captain Arthur Vincent Leonard
Died: June 27, 1918

Regimental Number:
NA
Survived War:
No
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Army Medical Corps
Battalion:
Llandovery Castle (Hospital Ship)
Company:
Place of Birth:
Warkworth, Ontario
Country:
Canada
Next of Kin:
Annie Leonard, mother. 1470 King Street West, Toronto, Ontario
Address at Enlistment:
1470 King Street West, Toronto, Ontario
Date of Birth:
October 29, 1889
Trade or Calling:
Doctor
Marital Status:
Single
Prior Military Experience:
No
Place of Enlistment:
Niagara Camp, Ontario
Date of Enlistment:
August 19, 1915
Age at enlistment:
25
Height:
5 Feet 9 Inches
Chest:
39 Inches
Expansion:
3 Inches
Religion:
Roman Catholic
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Killed in Action
Battle Died/Wounded:
Hospital Ship Llandovery Castle torpedoed 114 miles south-west of the Fastnet Rock by U86
Date of Death:
June 27, 1918
Age at Death:
28
Buried at:
Halifax Memorial, Nova Scotia
Plot:
Panel 2.
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
No
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Caucasian
Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Captain Canadian Army Medical Corps Llandovery Castle (Hospital Ship)
Captain Canadian Army Medical Corps 3rd Battalion Attached
Captain Canadian Army Medical Corps 16th Canadian General Hospital
Captain Canadian Army Medical Corps No. 2 Field Ambulance B Section

Son of Owen and Annie Leonard, of 1470 King St. West, Toronto, Ontario. He was a graduate of the Medical Class of 1911 at Toronto University.
The Hospital Ship Llandovery Castle, bound from Halifax, Nova Scotia, for Liverpool, was torpedoed on June 27th, 1918, 114 miles south-west of the Fastnet Rock by U-86. Despite regulation Red Cross lights, the ship was deliberatly torpedeod and most survivors, including 14 Nursing Sisters were machine gunned. The Llandovery Castle became the rallying cry for the Canadian troops during the Last 100 Days offensive.

In August 1915 he was appointed to the C.A.M.C., and served for a month at Niagara Camp before going overseas. He crossed to France in November 1915 and was attached as Medical Officer to the 2nd Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, later joining No. 2 Field Ambulance.  He took part in the battles of Somme, Vimy, and Hill 7c. In November 1717 he returned to England and joined the staff at No. 16 Canadian General Hospital at Orpington. In December of the same year he was attached to the Hospital ship service, first with H.M.H.S. 'Araguaya', and later, in March 1918, with H.M.H.S. 'Llandovery Castle'. He was drowned at sea when this ship was sunk by an enemy submarine.