CEF Soldier Detail

Private Arthur Shelford
Died: April 7, 1979

Regimental Number:
707221
Survived War:
Yes
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Infantry
Battalion:
103rd Battalion
Company:
Place of Birth:
Enenley, North Hants,
Country:
Next of Kin:
Charles Shelford [father], Enenley, Brackley,North Hants, England
Address at Enlistment:
Wistaria P.O., B.C.
Date of Birth:
July 29, 1885
Trade or Calling:
Farmer
Marital Status:
Single
Prior Military Experience:
No
Place of Enlistment:
Hazelton, British Columbia
Date of Enlistment:
July 1, 1916
Age at enlistment:
31
Height:
6 Feet 1 Inches
Chest:
41 Inches
Expansion:
5 Inches
Religion:
Church of England
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Unknown    
Cause of Death:
Survived
Battle Died/Wounded:
Wounded, Sep 2, 1918, Arras
Date of Death:
April 7, 1979
Age at Death:
94
Buried at:
Cremated
Plot:
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
No
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Not Specified
LAC Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 1Box 8840-52
Research Notes
103rd Battalion Nominal Roll
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Private Canadian Infantry 103rd Battalion

Pioneer Days in BC, Vol. two: ...by the spring of 1916 I decided to enlist and with [Norman] Allan Blackwell, the youngest son of a neighbour, walked 45 miles to Houston in a day.  Since there was no train we continued 30 miles along the track to Telkwa and caught the train to Hazelton.

Allan passed his examination without trouble but when I came before Dr Wrinch he wanted to turn me down because of flat feet.  I asked him what that implied, 'Why, you can't march.'

'I may not be able to march, but I walked 45 miles to Houston over a rough, muddy road in 25 hours and I will take an 80 pound pack on my back and walk up the Bulkley Valley against any man you like to choose."

Editor's note: During his military service, Shelford rose from private to Company Sergeant-major and took part in several of the bloodiest battles, including Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele and Arras.  He was wounded September 2, 1918, in the shoulder.  He spent the winter of 1918-19 in various English hospitals and met a nurse whom he eventually married.  He left for Canada early in April, 1919.

[His friend Blackwell [323512] was killed near Mons six days before the war ended.]