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Lieutenant William John McLean

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PERSONAL INFORMATION

Date of birth: 1890-02-25
Place of birth: Perth, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Next of kin: David McLean (father,) Perth, Ontario
Marital status: no data
Occupation (attested): Dental Surgeon
Occupation (normalized): Specialised Dentist
Address: Smiths Falls, Ontario
Religion: Presbyterian
Date of death: 1917-04-09
Cause of death: Killed in action

MILITARY INFORMATION

Regimental number: NA
Rank detail

Lieutenant, 18th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Army). .

Note: ee

Degree of service: Europe
Survived war: no
Battle wounded/killed: Killed by machine gun fire during the advance on, and capture of Vimy Ridge

RESEARCH INFORMATION

CVWM ID: No CVWM ID in our database, but try this.
CWGC ID: 65736
LAC ID: 159154
Attestation record(s): image 1
Service file: B7055-S054
Uploader's Notes: Son of David and Isabella Gallagher McLean; husband of Marguerite McLean, of 23, Derwas Court, Edmonton, Alberta. Born at Perth, Ontario.He belonged to the 42nd (Lanark & Renfrew) Regiment of the militia, and served 3 years in A.M.C. (Army Medical Corps.)He may have enlisted in the 139th Battalion (verified from other sources).IN THE MIDST OF THE CONFLICTLieut. Wm. McLean Writes of His Experiences in France.The following letter was received recently from Lieut. Wm. McLean by his father, Mr David McLean. Lieut. McLean went overseas with the 130th Battalion and has been in France in the think of the conflict for some time:France, Jan. 18th, 1917Dear Father: -I must write this evening for I may not have a chance again for some time. We came out of the line today after a month's stay. We had it very hard in the line for the weather was very bad most of the time. We had a couple of trips out of the trenches, but just long enough to have a night's sleep and a bath. The trenches were in very bad shape and it was nearly impossible to sleep, except when were were almost ready to drop. Bad and all as our trenches were they had nothing on the German trenches. Some of the recent prisoners seemed to think our trenches were fine. Just before we came out we some some real fighting and things were warm for 2 day[s] or so. Quite a bunch of prisoners were taken. Most of them were quite young chaps and were apparently quite glad to be taken. Our boys were in a hurry and blew up many dugouts that were full of Germans and in all probability cause many casualties.ieJan. 21st, 1917Since I started this letter things have happened. They were shelling while I was writing and a big one almost put us out of business. A fragment came through the door and knocked things about a bit. No one was hurt but we were busy for awhile and most of the time on the move.We are now away from the line, almost out of hearing of the guns, and run a good chance here of living to a ripe old age if we are here long enough. We marched out in full heavy marching order. It was quite a hike with a seventy-five pound pack, but the weather is cold now and did not mind it much. I expect we will be here for almost a month and probably into some 'show.' We are billeted in a little town. The billets are not very good, but i was luck and got a good bed. So once more I can get my clothes off. For over a month I never took off my boots except to change my socks or wash.The weather here now is very much like early winter weather in Canada. There is a little snow but scarcely any frost in the ground and it i is just cold enough to keep the snow from melting. I had a letter from Aunt Minnie the other day and a parcel with some maple sugar which was fine. We had it on our porridge while it lasted. Well, dad, news is scarce and I must write some more letters to-night.Give my love to all,William
Uploader's Research notes: Son of David and Isabella Gallagher McLean; husband of Marguerite McLean, of 23, Derwas Court, Edmonton, Alberta. Born at Perth, Ontario.He belonged to the 42nd (Lanark & Renfrew) Regiment of the militia, and served 3 years in A.M.C. (Army Medical Corps.)He may have enlisted in the 139th Battalion (verified from other sources).IN THE MIDST OF THE CONFLICTLieut. Wm. McLean Writes of His Experiences in France.The following letter was received recently from Lieut. Wm. McLean by his father, Mr David McLean. Lieut. McLean went overseas with the 130th Battalion and has been in France in the think of the conflict for some time:France, Jan. 18th, 1917Dear Father: -I must write this evening for I may not have a chance again for some time. We came out of the line today after a month's stay. We had it very hard in the line for the weather was very bad most of the time. We had a couple of trips out of the trenches, but just long enough to have a night's sleep and a bath. The trenches were in very bad shape and it was nearly impossible to sleep, except when were were almost ready to drop. Bad and all as our trenches were they had nothing on the German trenches. Some of the recent prisoners seemed to think our trenches were fine. Just before we came out we some some real fighting and things were warm for 2 day[s] or so. Quite a bunch of prisoners were taken. Most of them were quite young chaps and were apparently quite glad to be taken. Our boys were in a hurry and blew up many dugouts that were full of Germans and in all probability cause many casualties.ieJan. 21st, 1917Since I started this letter things have happened. They were shelling while I was writing and a big one almost put us out of business. A fragment came through the door and knocked things about a bit. No one was hurt but we were busy for awhile and most of the time on the move.We are now away from the line, almost out of hearing of the guns, and run a good chance here of living to a ripe old age if we are here long enough. We marched out in full heavy marching order. It was quite a hike with a seventy-five pound pack, but the weather is cold now and did not mind it much. I expect we will be here for almost a month and probably into some 'show.' We are billeted in a little town. The billets are not very good, but i was luck and got a good bed. So once more I can get my clothes off. For over a month I never took off my boots except to change my socks or wash.The weather here now is very much like early winter weather in Canada. There is a little snow but scarcely any frost in the ground and it i is just cold enough to keep the snow from melting. I had a letter from Aunt Minnie the other day and a parcel with some maple sugar which was fine. We had it on our porridge while it lasted. Well, dad, news is scarce and I must write some more letters to-night.Give my love to all,William

ARCHIVAL INFORMATION

Date added: 2004-09-04
Last modified: 2017-03-16